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Authorities explain the Marrakesh Treaty through a workshop

By Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados - 27/12/2017
Authorities explain the Marrakesh Treaty through a workshop

The Ministry of Industry, Trade and Development of Nicaragua, together with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), carried out a National Copyright Workshop on the Marrakesh Treaty. The activity was addressed for Blind Associations, lawyers and all other actors related to copyright issues in Nicaragua.

The General Director of the Intellectual Property Registry, Harry Peralta, explained that the objective was discussing the limits and exceptions of the international treaty, both for blind people as for people who have another type of disability that does not allow them to access printed texts.

The Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Otherwise Print Disabled, was adopted on June 27, 2013 in Marrakesh and it forms part of the body of international copyright treaties administered by WIPO. It has a clear humanitarian and social development dimension and its main goal is to create a set of mandatory limitations and exceptions for the benefit of the blind, visually impaired, and otherwise print disabled (VIPs). 

By Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados - 27/12/2017
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Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados

The Law Firm, specialized in the field of Intellectual Property, formerly known as Henry Caldera & Henry Caldera-Pallais, was founded in 1907 by Mr. Henry Caldera, as part of a three-way operation consisting also of the import and retail of goods. With time, these three operations became separate enterprises. That same year, and through the efforts of Mr. Caldera, Nicaragua had its first Trademark Law.

In the late 1930’s, Mr. Caldera’s older son, Henry Caldera-Pallais, after obtaining a Law degree in Nicaragua, furthered his studies in the University of Michigan, where he graduated to become a U.S. Registered Patent Agent. During his stay in the United States, he gained experience working with the New York firm of Lagner, Parry, Card and Largner. In the late 1940’s, Mr. Caldera-Pallais returned to Nicaragua to take charge of the Law Firm, which became known as Henry Caldera & Henry Caldera-Pallais.