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Nicaragua's traditional foods on their way to international protection

By Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados - 11/04/2019
Nicaragua's traditional foods on their way to international protection

The Nicaraguan Minister of Development, Industry and Trade (Mific), Orlando Solórzano, will present a proposal to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to register as appellation of origin four of the country’s most traditional food products: the doughnuts of Somoto, the northern coffee, the pitaya of Ticuantepe and the handicrafts of San Juan de Oriente.

The doughnuts or rosquillas are a traditional national dessert made from corn in the city of Somoto, located in the hills of northern Nicaragua; the northern coffee also refers to those hills located in the northern region of the country, tropical dry departments with ideal conditions for coffee cultivation; the pitaya or dragon fruit is a fruit of several different cactus species indigenous to the Americas, produced in the municipality of Ticuantepe, eastern Nicaragua; the handicrafts of San Juan de Oriente are also produced in the Eastern region of the country.

Solórzano will hold meetings with representatives of these four food sectors in order to send the technical production information of each product to the WIPO. 

By Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados - 11/04/2019
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Guy José Bendaña-Guerrero & Asociados

The Law Firm, specialized in the field of Intellectual Property, formerly known as Henry Caldera & Henry Caldera-Pallais, was founded in 1907 by Mr. Henry Caldera, as part of a three-way operation consisting also of the import and retail of goods. With time, these three operations became separate enterprises. That same year, and through the efforts of Mr. Caldera, Nicaragua had its first Trademark Law.

In the late 1930’s, Mr. Caldera’s older son, Henry Caldera-Pallais, after obtaining a Law degree in Nicaragua, furthered his studies in the University of Michigan, where he graduated to become a U.S. Registered Patent Agent. During his stay in the United States, he gained experience working with the New York firm of Lagner, Parry, Card and Largner. In the late 1940’s, Mr. Caldera-Pallais returned to Nicaragua to take charge of the Law Firm, which became known as Henry Caldera & Henry Caldera-Pallais.