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Peru joins the Geneva Act of the Lisbon Agreement and WIPO's classification treaties

By Espinosa Bellido Abogados - 22/07/2022

Peru has formally accessed to five treaties that are administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), after a meeting by the Executive-President of the National Institute for the Defense of Competition and the Protection of Intellectual Property (Indecopi), Julian Palacin, with WIPO Director General Daren Tang.

WIPO administers 26 intellectual property treaties, 14 of which Peru is a member. After depositing its accession to five additional treaties, the country will have joined a total of 19, according to Andina. "The agreements make it easier for innovators to protect their intellectual property," the WIPO stated in a press release.

Peru joined the Geneva Act of the Lisbon Agreement and the following WIPO's classification treaties:

-Locarno Agreement
-Nice Agreement
-Strasbourg Agreement
-Vienna Agreement

"The accession to the Geneva Act of the Lisbon Agreement on Appellations of Origin and Geographical Indications will enhance the value of our artisanal and agricultural products with sui generis characteristics," Palacin remarked. "This will particularly benefit our native communities and small enterprises. Peru has 10 appellations of origin, including our flagship drink Pisco, cacao, coffee, and even ceramics," he added.

-The Lisbon Agreement, and its latest revision, the Geneva Act of 2015, provide for the international protection of appellations of origin and geographical indications through a single procedure with WIPO. Appellations of origin and geographical indications are distinctive product designations which require a qualitative link between the product to which they refer and its place of origin. Together, the Lisbon Agreement and the Geneva Act of the Lisbon Agreement form the Lisbon system. The Bulletin is the official publication of the Lisbon system.

-The Locarno Agreement, concluded at Locarno in 1968 and amended in 1979, establishes a classification for industrial designs (the Locarno Classification). The competent offices of the Contracting States must indicate in official documents and in any publication they issue in respect of the deposit or registration of industrial designs the numbers of the classes and subclasses of the Classification to which the goods incorporating the designs belong.

-The Nice Agreement, concluded at Nice in 1957, revised at Stockholm in 1967 and at Geneva in 1977, and amended in 1979, establishes a classification of goods and services for the purposes of registering trademarks and service marks (the Nice Classification). The competent offices of the Contracting States must indicate in official documents and in any publication they issue in respect of the registration of marks the numbers of the classes of the Classification to which the goods or services for which the mark is registered belong.

-The Strasbourg Agreement establishes the International Patent Classification (IPC) which divides technology into eight sections with approximately 80,000 subdivisions. Each subdivision is denoted by a symbol consisting of Arabic numerals and letters of the Latin alphabet. The appropriate IPC symbols are indicated on patent documents (published patent applications and granted patents), of which over 2 million are issued each year. The appropriate symbols are allotted by the national or regional industrial property office that publishes the patent document. For PCT applications, IPC symbols are allotted by the International Searching Authority.

-The Vienna Agreement, concluded in Vienna in 1973 and amended in 1985, establishes a classification (the Vienna Classification) for marks that consist of, or contain, figurative elements. The competent offices of Contracting States must indicate in official documents and in any publication they issue in respect of the registration of marks the numbers of the categories, divisions and sections of the Classification to which the figurative elements of those marks belong.

By Espinosa Bellido Abogados - 22/07/2022
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Espinosa Bellido Abogados

The Industrial Property work of Estudio Francisco Espinosa Bellido Abogados started in 1941 with Dr. Francisco Espinosa Sánchez, father of current senior partner Dr. Francisco Espinosa Bellido and grandfather of current partner Dr. Francisco Espinosa Reboa.

In its 69 years of outstanding legal work the firm has represented the interests of several national and international clients, companies and foreign correspondents obtaining and defending their industrial property rights in Peru, while also displaying an active and remarkable participation in the direction of professional associations in our speciality.

We specialize in counselling, prosecution and litigation in trademarks, patents, trade names, slogans, industrial designs, copyright, domain names, enforcement of those rights as well as unfair competition.